Thursday, 7 July 2016

Make Machine Buttonholes

This technique is courtesy of Sandra Betzina. She recommends using a 70/10 HJ needle (actually a denim needle, has a great eye) and silk thread or machine embroidery thread. If, after cutting open a buttonhole, the interfacing shows, colour in with a fabric marker.

On sheer fabrics:

  • Choose the buttonhole stitch which has both ends rounded out.
  • After cutting open the buttonhole (scissors or chisel) trim the internal thread ends and add Fray Block to the stitches on both the RS and WS. Allow to dry completely.Butt

On stretch woven fabrics:

  • Choose a buttonhole stitch which has a widely spaced zig zag stitch - anything close together will just stretch and bag out (similar to a lettuce edge).
  • Stabilise the buttonhole using Solvy (dissolves in water) by wrapping it around the buttonhole and then tearing off.
  • Add Fray Block to the stitches on both the RS and WS. Allow to dry completely.

On knit fabrics:

  • Stabilise the buttonhole using Solvy (dissolves in water) by wrapping it around the buttonhole and then tearing off.
  • Add Fray Block to the stitches on both the RS and WS. Allow to dry completely.

On pleather:

  • Don't sew a buttonhole, just sew a box in a regular stitch and cut open.

Corded buttonholes:

  • Use Buttonhole Twist to cord large buttonholes that would otherwise stretch out.

Buttons with a shank:

  • e.g. on a jacket or a coat.
  • Choose a keyhole buttonhole.
  • After cutting open the buttonhole, use a leather punch for the key hole (smallest size)
  • Trim threads with scissors.
  • Add Fray Block to the stitches on both the RS and WS. Allow to dry completely.

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