Sunday, 7 July 2019

Patternmaking - Collar w Stand - Cert 3, TAFE

This technique is courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher.

Technique:

Stand

  1. Draw vertical and horizontal guidelines to line the stand along. The stand will be drawn in the lowermost angle
  2. Measure half the finished neckline, front and back, including the neck edge of the placket eg 19cm
  3. Measure the back neckline (identifies the shoulder point) eg 8cm
  4. From the CB, along the horizontal guideline, measure out to the shoulder point (8cm), mark, then to the end of the neckline (19cm), mark.
  5. At 3cm up the vertical guideline (=CB), measure out to the shoulder point (8cm).
  6. The stand 'rise' (from the lower stand point) is 1.5cm (looser) - 3cm (tighter) above the 19cm mark. Use a French Curve to join the shoulder point to the rise point.
  7. Trace the shoulder, neckline and top 5cm or so of the front placket. Line the first 1 - 2cm of the tracing neckline/placket point up with the first 1 - 2cm of the lower stand point. Extend the line of the top 5cm or so of the front placket by 3cm = the angled side of the stand.
  8. Draw in the top curve of the stand (= the same as the lower curve).
  9. Add a 1.5cm extension to the side end of the stand if a button extension is needed.

Upper Collar

  1. Trace the upper curve of the stand, flip it over and trace to get the opposite curve (= lower curve of the collar). Line the outer points up together with the inner point on the vertical guideline 1.5cm above the stand.
  2. Mark in the shoulder point. Draw in the collar upper curve 3.5cm above the lower curve (= CB), and a straight line to the shoulder point (eg 8cm)
  3. The rest of the collar upper curve is 'designers choice' - as big or wide as you like.
  4. To check how the whole thing will look together, trace the collar and the flip it down, matching it to the upper curve of the stand. This will give you the look of the stand and how long/wide the collar is in comparison to the CF.




Friday, 21 June 2019

Sandwich Collar (1-piece collar) - Cert 3, TAFe

This technique is courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher. In this method, a 1-piece collar is sandwiched between the garment and the facing.

Technique:

1.    Prepare the Garment and Facings:

·      Sew the back and front shoulders of the garment, RS together, in a 1.5cm seam and overlock.
·      Sew the back and front facings, RS together, in a 1.5cm seam and overlock.
·      Press all seams to the back/back facing
·      Overlock the lower edges of the facings.

2.    Prepare the Collar

·      Sew the two collar pieces together, RS together, on all 3 sides (not the neck edge)
·      Understitch and bag out. Press, rolling the understitching underneath.
·      Match and check evenness of collar lengths.
·      Do not trim the uneven neckline edge.

3.    Putting it All Together.

·      Staystitch the neck edge of the collar at less than 0.6cm.
·      Clip centres of collar, back of garment and back facing.
·      With RS of garment up and RS of collar up, pin the CBs together then match shoulders to collar notches and CF notches to collar points. The distance between CF line on garment and the collar must be exactly even on both sides.
·      With collar underneath, stitch 0.6cm seam, easing in and with no puckers.
·      Pin the facing to the collar/garment, matching shoulders and sandwiching the collar in between.
·      With the facing underneath, stitch just inside the previous stitching line to hide it. Make no tucks.
·      Understitch the seam allowance to the facing, between the shoulder seams.



Saturday, 15 June 2019

Two Piece Collar (Collar with Stand)

This technique is courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher. In this method, 1 x stand and 1 x collar piece are interfaced. The stand is always <4cm wide (unless a design feature), All stand and collar seams are 0.6cm but the shirt neckline seam is 1cm..

Technique:

1.    Preparing the Stand:

·      Turn under 0.6cm on the neckline curve of the stand (the longer edge without the shaped ends) and stitch close to the raw edge (not the fold). This stitching needs to be neat as it will show. Fold in half and check that the ends are all exactly the same.

2.    Preparing the Collar

·      With RS together, stitch collars together on 3 edges (not neckline seam). Fold in half and check that the ends are all exactly the same. Clip across the corners and bag out. Press, favouring the upper (interfaced) collar. If there is any unevenness in the neckline seam, trim.
·      Baste the neckline seam at 0.6cm.
·      Edgestitch and topstitch the 3 finished edges. Press.
·      Clip centres of interfaced stand and collar. With RS together, pin collar and interfaced stand together starting at the centre and working out as they are different shapes. Stitch in a 0.6cm seam. Note that the collar is shorter than the stand at each end.

3.    Preparing the Shirt

·      Machine the shoulder seams in a 1cm seam, matching neck points exactly. Overlock, press to back.
·      Fold the front tab to the first notch and then over again. Edgestitch vertically along the second fold.

4.    Adding Stands to Collar

·      Sandwich the collar between the two stands, matching the stand points and checking that there is a 1cm gap right along the bottom edge between the raw edge of the uninterfaced stand that will attach to the shirt and the folded edge of the interfaced stand. Trim the uninterfaced seam allowance to an even width using the interfaced stand as a guide.to an even width.
·      Stitch the short end at 1cm then the long edge at 0.6cm then the short end at 1cm with the interfaced stand on top so that you can stitch just inside the previous stitching line.
·      Don’t trim, bag out. Fold in half and check that the ends are all exactly the same.

5.    Putting it All Together

·      Clip the CB shirt and CB collar.
·      With RS together, pin the uninterfaced stand to the shirt neckline matching centres and ends. Match the inside seam point of the stand to the seam point on the shirt neckline exactly. Stitch in a 1cm seam with the shirt on top, making sure that the matching seam points do not shift, and stretching the shirt neckline to match the length of the uninterfaced stand.

·      Tuck the seam inside and cover with interfaced stand edge, using your nail to check that the folded edge covers the seam line underneath. Pin to prevent twisting. Edgestitch from the WS, starting in the lower centre of the stand and going all the way around. Manipulate the fabric as you go to prevent the matching seam points from shifting.


Cuff with Sleeve Packet - Cert 3, TAFE

This technique is courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher. In this method, Placket refers to the upper placket and Tab refers to the under-placket.

Technique:

1.    Prepare the Placket:


  • ·      Press the plackets around a cardboard template to create a mirror pair, turning under seam allowances. 

2.    Attach the Tab to the Sleeve


  •        Staystitch at 0.6cm around the slit on the sleeves and check against each other to make sure they’re even. 
  •        Clip into the corners of the box created to form a triangle.
  •        Lie the RS of the tab to the WS of the sleeve, the narrower side of the sleeve, (the tab will be underneath) with raw edges even and tab about 2cm above the top of the slit, and stitch along previous stitching line. Note that the tab goes on the shorter side of the sleeve while the placket goes on the wider side
  •     Open out the tab, fold the SA in towards it and then fold tab over again. Make this even by folding the raw edge to the stitching line and then bringing the fold over to the stitching line so that it covers the raw edge. This forms the under-placket. Edgestitch in place from the corner down on the RS.
  •        Sew the triangle in place. To do this, from the RS pinch the fabric either side of the top of the slit, flipping the top part of the fabric to the back. Turn over and poke the triangle through. Stitch along the base of the triangle, through all layers, being careful not to catch the tab.
  •       Cut the top half of the tab off leaving about 1cm.

3.    Attach the Placket to the Sleeve


  •       Tuck the placket under the other side of the slit, with the WS of the (long side of the) placket to the WS of the sleeve (the placket will be underneath), lying the placket fold 5mm past the previous stitching line and butting up close into the corner of the slit.
  •        Fold the placket to the outside so that the folded edge of the other side lies over the previous stitching line as well (ie, the stitching line is sandwiched between the two folded edges of the placket).
  •       Edgestitch through all thicknesses and forming a cross at the pointy part of the placket, keeping the tab out of the way. 

4.    Add the Cuff to the Sleeve


  •        Trim the bottom of the sleeve.
  •        Sew the sleeve seam in a 1cm SA and overlock
  •        Make pleats at the bottom of the sleeve – the pleats face towards the placket and away from the tab.
  •        Press the long edge of the cuff under 1cm.
  •        Fold in half lengthwise, RS together, and sew short ends in a 1cm seam making sure that the raw edge is 1cm longer than the folded edge.
  •        With WS cuff and sleeve together, open out seam and stitch a 1cm seam, making sure the seam points match exactly.
  •       Press the SA towards the cuff and edgestitch the top of the cuff in place from the RS

Saturday, 8 June 2019

Elastic Waistbands, 3 ways - Cert 3, TAFE

These techniques are courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher.
Cheap and Nasty.
1.    Over lock the elastic to the WS of the waist edge, stretching out the elastic, before the CB seam is sewn.
2.    Turn the elastic down and stitch from the WS in the middle of the overlocking, stretching out the elastic.

A Nicer Way
1.    Overlock the completed waist edge
2.    Overlap the elastic ends and stitch vertically, twice.
3.    Put elastic circle into garment circle and fold the fabric down over the elastic on the WS to cover it. Line the overlocking up with the lower edge of the elastic and stitch on RHS of overlocking. Pull the elastic through the casing as you go, don’t stretch it out.
For Fine Fabrics eg slips, underwear, chiffon, where not too bulky even when turned
1.    Complete the waist edge.
2.    Overlap the elastic ends and stitch vertically, twice.
3.    Stitch the circle of elastic to the waist edge, RS together in a small 0.5cm seam.
4.    Flip to the WS and stitch along the lower edge of elastic.


Woven Shorts - Cert 3, TAFE

Woven Shorts with invisible zipper, back waist facing, elasticated front, side panels and side seam pockets. This technique is courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher. Here the waist facing and invisible zipper are at the back of the shorts but they could easily be at eg the front of a skirt with an elasticated back waistband.
Fronts
1.    Sew the CF crotch curve in a 1cm SA
2.    Insert side seam pockets
3.    Overlock pockets/CF crotch curve with RS up
4.    Attach side panels to fronts w pockets uppermost in a 1cm SA
5.    Overlock the panel/front side seams and the waist edge
6.    Lie the elastic (3/4 x front waist length) along the waistline, WS together, below the row of overlocking and secure each end vertically.
7.    Fold all down with overlocking lying below the edge of the elastic, and stitch in the middle of the overlocking without catching the elastic and by pulling the elastic through the casing, not stretching it out.
Backs
1.    Interface the facings and overlock the lower edges.
2.    Overlock the back crotch seam.
3.    Insert invisible zipper
4.    Lie facing on back, RS together and stitch vertically through facing/zipper tape with zipper foot, close to the teeth
5.    Sew the waist seam.
6.    Turn to the inside and bag out.
7.    Understitch the facing/seams as far as possible.
8.    Sew the rest of the back crotch seam with a zipper foot, overlying previous zipper stitching by 1cm.
Putting it all Together
1.    Trim the side edges.
2.    Lie fronts and back together with facing opened out and waist seams even. Fold the facing over the gathered edge of the front waistband. Pin and stitch side seams in a 1.5cm seam, moving gathers out of the way as necessary.
4.    Sew the inside seam of the legs and overlock both side seams and inside seams.

5.    Hem the shorts.

Tuesday, 4 June 2019

Sleeve Variations - Cert III, TAFE

These techniques are courtesy of Alex Krambousanos, TAFE teacher. There ares two sleeve blocks (1) the straight sleeve block, and (2) the fitted sleeve block which has an elbow dart (if you pivoted this dart into the hem it would form the straight sleeve block) but these variations all use the straight sleeve block shortened to a short sleeve.

Technique 1: Adding flare to a sleeve hem (the armscye is unchanged)

  • Measure your bicep and then measure how big you want the hem
  • Trace the straight sleeve block = the Master pattern
  • Make the sleeve a short sleeve (about halfway between the armscye and the elbow)
  • Divide the sleeve into 6 vertical panels eg 33.5/6 = 5.6cm each panel
  • Trace onto white paper = the Intermediate pattern
  • Cut from the bottom of each panel to the pivot point at the top = 5 pivot points
  • Lie the Intermediate pattern over the Master pattern and stick the centre pivot point at top in place. Splay the panels out from the centre, taping as you go, the amount required to get the extra hem width eg 7.4cm.
  • Trace onto white pattern = Final pattern. The lower hem is drawn by drawing straight along the pattern piece panels and curving the in-between sections (measure one leg and then mark that length in the middle of the blank space then fill in with French Curve).

Technique 2: Adding flare to a sleeve cap

  • Trace the straight sleeve block = the Master pattern
  • Make the sleeve a short sleeve (about halfway between the armscye and the elbow)
  • Divide the sleeve into 6 vertical panels eg 33.5/6 = 5.6cm each panel
  • Trace onto white paper = the Intermediate pattern
  • Cut from the top of each panel to the pivot point at the bottom = 5 pivot points
  • Lie the Intermediate pattern over the Master pattern and stick the centre pivot point at the hem in place. Splay the panels out from the centre, taping as you go, the amount required eg 7.4cm.
  • Problems = pointy panels and gathers under the arm. Ideally the gathers should be between the front and back notches so close the two panels on either side, means there are 3 pivot points.
  • Trace onto white pattern = Final pattern. The armscye curve is drawn by joining the outermost panel points up to the centre of the sleeve top which should be raised 2 - 4cm (or more for design)  ie ignore the inner panel points. The outermost panel points may need to be shaved off to get a smooth curve (may take ~1cm off)
  • Add the wiggly gathering lines above the notches.
  • NB: if you want to pleat the sleeve cap, don't add extra height and trace/fold pleats to get points.

Technique 3: Adding flare to both the sleeve hem and the sleeve cap.

  • Trace the straight sleeve block = the Master pattern
  • Make the sleeve a short sleeve (about halfway between the armscye and the elbow)
  • Divide the sleeve into 6 vertical panels eg 33.5/6 = 5.6cm each panel
  • Trace onto white paper = the Intermediate pattern
  • Don't add any spread under the arms so keep the outer 2 panels together = 2 panels, 3 pivot points.
  • Cut all the way between the panels.
  • Lie the Intermediate pattern over the Master pattern, starting at the LHS and taping in place. Spread the other panels out by eg 7.4cm using the hemline as a reference point, taping in place.
  • Trace onto white paper = Final pattern. Draw in the straight hem and side seams and armscye. Add 2 - 4cm to centre top of sleeve and then draw in a curve from the outer panel points with the French Curve.
  • Draw in wiggly gather lines eg at hem 1 - 2cm from side seams, at the cap from 1 - 2cm above notches.